BALKAN LITERATURE PLUS UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH: DUE 1/16/2018

English Assignments 7-12
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GinnyLight
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BALKAN LITERATURE PLUS UPPER SCHOOL ENGLISH: DUE 1/16/2018

Post by GinnyLight » Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:07 am

***If you would like to submit a poem to Soundings for Q2 extra credit, you may do so ASAP. First, send your poem to me at: ginny.light@yahoo.com). Then, I will send it to you with suggestions for revision. When your poem is revised, you should send it to Mrs. Silverstein (JoanS@td.edu) and copy me. In the subject line, write: YOUR NAME—SOUNDINGS. Be sure to title your poem. The deadline for all submissions is January 19th.


***Please note: all SSR Reading Logs are due on Friday, January 19th on Ms. Light's desk. You will have five minutes in class to fill in the second box on the front sheet of your reading log. If you have been recording your reading all along (and you should be doing so), then you will need only five minutes to input the title of each book you have read (completed or not) and the total number of pages that you read in each book. Please remember that books related to TV shows or films are worth 150 pages.

MUG ISSUES FOR Q2 (MUG #9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15):

Possessive apostrophe: Add an apostrophe and –s to form the possessive of most singular nouns, including those that end in -s, and of indefinite pronouns (e.g., everybody, other, one, etc.).

Parallelism: All items in a series should be in parallel form—all nouns, all verbs, all prepositional phrases, and so on.

Parallelism: When you link ideas with and, but, or nor, for, so, or yet, try to make the ideas parallel in structure. Always use the same structure after both parts of a correlative conjunction: either . . . or, both . . . and, neither . . . nor, not . . . but, not only . . . but also, just as . . . so, whether . . . or.

Hyphens: Hyphenate most compound adjectives that precede a noun, but not those that follow a noun.

Commas: Set off nonrestrictive elements.

Commas: Separate items in a series.

Commas: Set off contrasting elements.

Comma splices result from placing only a comma between independent clauses—groups of words that can stand alone as a sentence. Use correct punctuation (e.g., a period, a semicolon,) or add a coordinating conjunction (e.g., FANBOYS) to link the clauses.

Spelling: espresso, fish sticks, piece, peace, Mountain Dew, receiving, vigorously, possesses, facts, fax, fudge, whipped, banana splits, cannot, everyone, through, though, deserted, dessert.

Capitalize proper nouns (e.g., names).

Avoid unnecessary shifts in verb tense.

Make sure that pronouns and antecedents agree in person, number, and gender.

Make sure that subjects and verbs agree.

Use end punctuation (e.g., a period).

Avoid shifts in person and tense.

Possessive apostrophe use for singular and plural forms.

Dangling modifiers: A dangling modifier is a word or phrase that modifies a word not clearly stated in the sentence (e.g., Having finished the assignment, the TV was turned on SHOULD BE: Having finished the assignment, Jill turned on the TV.).

Use adverbs to modify adjectives.


BALKAN LITERATURE

1. Please complete the following two MUG Shots for next Tuesday, January 16th:

MUG #16

For many years Ted a well regarded architech worked overtime to pay off his odious budget killing student loans.

Oil which is lighter then water always raises to the surface.

MUG #17

In the living room Jackson kicked the television angered by the basketball score.

When Grandma wasnt looking Elysa filled the dogs bowls with leftover's from the meal.

2. A reminder: SSR Book Logs are due in class on Friday, January 19th.

3. Please note: Our Balkan Literature and Beyond Midterm will take place on Monday, January 29th. It’s not too early to begin your review: Q1 Quarterly, MUG Shots, the hero’s journey and Robert Elise article, “Scanderbeg and Ballaban,” and poetry terms. Also, please remember to bring blue and/or black ink pens to fill in the Zipgrade answer sheet bubbles.

4. For our upcoming unit on Albanian prose, I am ordering copies of Ismail Kadare’s Doruntine, a Novel. Please bring $10 for your copy, which will be yours to keep. T-D will absorb additional costs, as this book is fairly expensive, even used.


ENGLISH 9

1. Please do some research, and fill in the handout on Edgar Allan Poe for Tuesday, January 16th. Avoid using Wikipedia!

2. Also, please complete the following two MUG Shots for next Tuesday, January 16th:

MUG #16

For many years Ted a well regarded architech worked overtime to pay off his odious budget killing student loans.

Oil which is lighter then water always raises to the surface.

MUG #17

In the living room Jackson kicked the television angered by the basketball score.

When Grandma wasnt looking Elysa filled the dogs bowls with leftover's from the meal.

3. Reminder: Reading Logs are due on Friday, January 19th.

4. Please have these literary terms in your notes:
simile: a straightforward comparison using like, as, than, or resembles
metaphor: a figurative identification of two things that can be directly stated
extended metaphor: a metaphor that continues beyond the first comparative sentence and could be an entire work.
symbolism: a person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself
denotation: the exact dictionary definition (literal meaning) of a word
connotation: an idea or feeling that a word invokes in addition to its actual definition
irony: a discrepancy between expectation and reality
verbal irony: statements that imply a meaning in opposition to their literal meaning
situational irony: actions taken have an effect exactly opposite from what was intended
dramatic irony: in literature, this occurs when the audience knows an unwitting character is making a mistake. Often, these actions cause our guts to churn.
personification: when a writer gives an animal or inanimate object human traits
pathetic fallacy: a fancier phrase for personification
foreshadow: the use of hints/clues to suggest what will happen later in a story
flashback: a scene that interrupts the normal narrative timeline in order to provide information about something that happened earlier in the story
hyperbole: a ridiculous exaggeration
paradox: a statement that appears self-contradictory, yet reveals a kind of truth and shows the complexities of life

5. Please note: Our English 9 Midterm will take place on Tuesday, January 30th. It’s not too early to begin your review: Q1 Quarterly, MUG Shots, literary terms, vocabulary from Words on Wednesday, “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” and "The Cask of Amontillado." Also, please remember to bring blue and/or black ink pens to fill in the Zipgrade answer sheet bubbles.


BRITISH LITERATURE

1. On Tuesday, January 16th, we will have an open-book quiz on Macbeth, Act II.

2. Please complete the following two MUG Shots for next Wednesday, January 17th:

MUG #16

For many years Ted a well regarded architech worked overtime to pay off his odious budget killing student loans.

Oil which is lighter then water always raises to the surface.

MUG #17

In the living room Jackson kicked the television angered by the basketball score.

When Grandma wasnt looking Elysa filled the dogs bowls with leftover's from the meal.

3. A reminder: SSR Reading Logs are due on Friday, January 19th.

4. Please note: Our British Literature Midterm will take place on Wednesday, January 31st. It’s not too early to begin your review: Q1 Quarterly, Renaissance, Shakespeare, and Globe quiz, Macbeth, and MUG Shots. Also, please remember to bring blue and/or black ink pens to fill in the Zipgrade answer sheet bubbles.


ENGLISH 10

1. On Tuesday, we will have a five-question quizzer on Julius Caesar, Act I. Please finish Act I, and complete your Study Guide questions.

2. You should have in your notes the following literary terms:
simile: a straightforward comparison using like, as, than, or resembles
metaphor: a figurative identification of two things that can be directly stated
extended metaphor: a metaphor that continues beyond the first comparative sentence and could be an entire work.
symbolism: a person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself
denotation: the exact dictionary definition (literal meaning) of a word
connotation: an idea or feeling that a word invokes in addition to its actual definition
irony: a discrepancy between expectation and reality
verbal irony: statements that imply a meaning in opposition to their literal meaning
situational irony: actions taken have an effect exactly opposite from what was intended
dramatic irony: in literature, this occurs when the audience knows an unwitting character is making a mistake. Often, these actions cause our guts to churn.
personification: when a writer gives an animal or inanimate object human traits
pathetic fallacy: a fancier phrase for personification
foreshadow: the use of hints/clues to suggest what will happen later in a story
flashback: a scene that interrupts the normal narrative timeline in order to provide information about something that happened earlier in the story
hyperbole: a ridiculous exaggeration
paradox: a statement that appears self-contradictory, yet reveals a kind of truth and shows the complexities of life

3. Please complete the following two MUG Shots for next Tuesday, January 16th:

MUG #16

For many years Ted a well regarded architech worked overtime to pay off his odious budget killing student loans.

Oil which is lighter then water always raises to the surface.

MUG #17

In the living room Jackson kicked the television angered by the basketball score.

When Grandma wasnt looking Elysa filled the dogs bowls with leftover's from the meal.

4. A reminder: SSR Reading Logs are due on Friday, January 19th.

5. Please note: Our English 10 Midterm will take place on Thursday, February 1st. It’s not too early to begin your review: Q1 Quarterly, Renaissance, Shakespeare, and Globe quiz, Julius Caesar, MUG Shots, literary terms, vocabulary from Words on Wednesday, Tone Presentation notes (please see below). Also, please remember to bring blue and/or black ink pens to fill in the Zipgrade answer sheet bubbles.

6. Here are the notes from our Tone Presentation:
subtext: an underlying and often distinct theme in a piece of writing or conversation
tone: particular quality, pitch, modulation, or inflection of the voice expressing or indicating affirmation, interrogation, hesitation, decision, or some feeling or emotion; vocal expression.
stress: relative loudness or force of vocal utterance; a greater degree of vocal force characterizing one syllable as compared with other syllables of the word, or one part of a syllable as compared with the rest; stress-accent. Also, superior loudness of voice as a means of emphasizing one or more of the words of a sentence more than the rest.

7. Due to our recent snow days and to allow time for in-class exercises and writing, our Julius Caesar essay drafts are now due on Monday, February 26th. Please refer to your packet on essay structure. We will return to this packet after Midterms and Glory Days.


AMERICAN LITERATURE

1. Here are the due dates for your writing project:

Tuesday, January 16: Journal #1 (For this first journal, you must attach the Conventions Rubric.)

Monday, January 22: Journal #2 (Attach the rubric of your choice.)

Monday, February 12: Journal #3 (Attach the rubric of your choice.)

Wednesday, February 21: Journal #4 (Attach the rubric of your choice.)

Monday, February 26: Journal #5 (Attach the rubric of your choice.)

Monday, March 5: FIVE (5) journals (Turn in for a completion grade. No rubric is required.)

2. Please complete the following two MUG Shots for next Tuesday, January 16th:

MUG #16

For many years Ted a well regarded architech worked overtime to pay off his odious budget killing student loans.

Oil which is lighter then water always raises to the surface.

MUG #17

In the living room Jackson kicked the television angered by the basketball score.

When Grandma wasnt looking Elysa filled the dogs bowls with leftover's from the meal.

3. A reminder: SSR Reading Logs are due on Friday, January 19th.

4. Please note: Our American Literature Midterm will take place on Friday, February 2nd. It’s not too early to begin your review: Q1 Quarterly, MUG Shots, Phillis Wheatley, Benjamin Franklin, Franklin and Emerson, “First Harvest,” and Washington Irving’s “The Devil and Tom Walker.” Also, please remember to bring blue and/or black ink pens to fill in the Zipgrade answer sheet bubbles.

5. On Tuesday, we will go over “First Harvest, 1800-1840” Review questions (1-10) on page 125 for a quiz on Wednesday.
Ms. G. Light
Upper School English Teacher
Thornton-Donovan School

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